The Whitewater Rafter's Guide to the 8 Auspicious Symbols of Buddhism

by Trecia Ehrlich

It won’t take longer than a five minute stroll through any monastery, street, or bridge in Bhutan to find artistic representations of the 8 auspicious symbols of Buddhism. But these symbols aren’t present just for aesthetics. They represent the offerings received by Buddha from the gods after his enlightenment.

By searching for deeper meaning in these symbols, we can become better people, and perhaps just as importantly, better whitewater enthusiasts.

The Endless or Eternal Knot represents interaction, or cause and effect. Much like the eternal knot, on the river we see how all variables above us affect us downstream. Whether it is rain increasing our flow, or pollution of a tributary affecting the quality of our rivers, each river is like it’s own endless knot.

The Endless Knot

The Endless Knot

The Vase represents prosperity and a long life, it represents the idea that no matter what we take out of the vase, it remains full of offerings. This reminds me of the African Proverb “No Matter how full the river, it still wants to grow.”

The Treasure Vase

The Treasure Vase

The Lotus Flower is born from its roots in the mud, and grows through muddy waters until it reaches the air and rises above the water as a beautiful flower. This teaches us that we must rise above hardship in order to blossom.

The Lotus Flower

The Lotus Flower

Two Golden Fish represent good luck, and teach us that if we practice dharma, or good behavior, we should not fear drowning.

Two Golden Fish

Two Golden Fish

The Parasol represents protection from the heat and the sun, and therefore protection from suffering. Don’t forget to pack sunscreen!

The Parasol

The Parasol

The Conch Shell represents good actions permeating through sound to the masses, who awake from ignorance into enlightenment. The Conch Shell also has a deep history in river rafting, originally being used on the very first commercial trips down the Grand Canyon to awaken guests for coffee (enlightenment).

The Conch Shell

The Conch Shell

The Dharma Wheel has eight spokes, each spoke representing the eightfold path. The eightfold path is the path to enlightenment, which requires pure intentions and commitment to practice, ethical conduct and mental discipline.

The Dharma Wheel

The Dharma Wheel

The Banner of Victory was awarded to Buddha when he conquered Mara, a demon that represented pride and fear of death. This is important in the world of boating, because it reminds us that the pride we have in our skills can never win over the power of nature and water.

The Banner of Victory

The Banner of Victory

Recommended Books about Bhutan


Originally Published: | Updated on

Comments



Author

Trecia Ehrlich

Treesh has been working for NWRC since 2010. When she's not rowing a boat, you can find her climbing, playing guitar, cooking, or writing in Truckee, CA.

Connect with Treesh:   Google+   Facebook   Twitter

Related Posts

Bhutan’s Bodhisattvas of Compassion, Wisdom, and Power

/ Friday, November 22, 2019

Chana Dorje, bodhisattava of power

Chenrezig, Manjushuri, and Chana Dorje are three of the most important figures in Mahāyāna Buddhism. They are, respectively, the bodhisattvas of compassion, wisdom, and power. What is a Bodhisattva? Bodhisattvas are beings who have attained enlightenment, allowing them enter nirvana. Out of compassion for others, they have chosen instead to continue suffering in order to to help others attain enlightenment. Bodhi means enlightened and sattva means being. Therefore, Bodhisattva translates as “enlightened being.” They are commonly referred to as gods in Western culture. The Dalai Lama...

Bhutan Frequently Asked Questions

/ Monday, May 13, 2019

Prayer Wheel in Bhutan

Bhutan is a small mountain kingdom nestled in the Himalayan Mountains between India and China. Each November we organize a few small groups tours to explore its monasteries (lhakhang), fortresses (dzongs) and rivers (chhu). Are we in Bhutan for 12 days? Our trip itinerary is 12 days and we are in Bhutan for 9 days. The itinerary includes two days of travel at beginning and one day at the end. You will be responsible for booking your flight to and from Bangkok, but we will arrange...